All Kids Are Artists with the Silhouette Mint

A couple of months ago, I did a video interview for Silhouette for their Mint. It’s now up on my YouTube channel. Check it out here or the embedded video below.


In the video I mention that anyone can be an artist with the Silhouette Mint. It’s so true! I volunteer as a youth leader for 8-12 year old girls in our congregation. We meet twice a month to talk about spiritual doctrine, learn new skills, socialize and do fun activities. As a learning activity, I taught them about the design process and had them come up with their own stamp designs. I was so impressed with the skill and focus of each of these girls! A few of them had me help them with their word art. I was a little reluctant to do that because I wanted them to have full ownership, so I made them trace and add their own personal touches to do that.

This was perhaps one of my favorite activities as their leader. Seeing them thoughtfully come up with a design, draft and draw it out was so satisfying. For best results when making your own stamps:

  • Use the brightest paper you can find. Premium laser paper is smooth and solid white.
  • Use a black, black marker. I love Pigma Professional markers for this.
  • Draw graphic at a larger scale.
  • Scan your work at 300 DPI or snap a photo under natural light.
  • Adjust your image to make your blacks blacker and your whites whiter. I adjust in my photos setting, or use your favorite image editor.
  • Open into Silhouette Mint software & make!

If you’d like to get your own Mint, now is definitely the time!! Right now they’re only $49.99 (down from $129.99)!!! That’s a steal. With Christmas around the corner, I think it’s a no-brainer.

Mom’s Best-Ever Breadsticks

These breadsticks were a family staple growing up. I’ve finally figured out how not to destroy the yeast when cooking, so now it’s a staple in our house, too. They’re incredibly easy to make and require very few ingredients. You can play around with the seasonings you have on-hand to change up the flavors of these breadsticks.


The recipe I’m sharing with you deviates slightly from my mom’s recipe, but it’s simply because I rarely ever have malted milk on hand. In this recipe, instead of calling for warm water and malted milk, I simplify with whole milk. I’m sure any other milk will do, we’re just a whole milk family.


I use a hook mixer for the entire thing. If you don’t have a stand mixer like this (or a Bosch), you can get away with mixing by hand.

Mom’s Best-Ever Breadsticks

Makes 1 11×17 jelly roll pan

  • 1 Tbs. yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups warm milk
  • 1 Tbs. honey
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 4-4 1/2 cups flour

Warm the milk to slightly warmer than room temperature (like 90-100 degrees). Add yeast and allow to bloom, 5 minutes. Add honey.

In a separate bowl, mix together salt and flour. Slowly incorporate with the yeast mixture. Mix only until flour is barely incorporated. DO NOT OVERMIX.

Remove dough from the bowl, knead to incorporate the last bit of flour and roll out to fit the jelly roll pan.

  • 2 Tbs. melted butter
  • garlic salt
  • pepper
  • parmesan cheese

Place dough onto a greased pan, cut in 1″ strips with a pizza cutter. Sprinkle butter and desired toppings (see above for ideas). Spray stretch wrap with non-stick spray and cover the breadsticks. Let raise for 2-3 hours.

Bake at 450º for 12 minutes. Serve.



Add some chipotle powder for a kick. Serve with your favorite soup, marinara sauce or salad.



The Right Calligraphy Materials

One of the many draws to calligraphy as a hobby is that it’s a desktop craft. It can take up as much space as a simple shoe box. Or it can take up several rooms. But the shoebox is where it starts. It’s not like skiing where you have to get the skis, and the boots and the bindings, and the pants and the jacket and the gloves and the poles and the goggles and… and… and…


Getting into calligraphy can be as simple and cheap or as expensive and elaborate as your budget allows. There are fabulous materials in every price range. Let’s break it down into 3 price ranges, shall we? This post has been created with affiliate links, but I strongly recommend ordering through Paper & Ink Arts regardless. They have fabulous customer service and tons of amazing calligraphy-related products.


You really can get great materials without spending a pretty penny. But there are a couple of caveats that go with going bargain-basement. Once you understand the limitations, you can better enjoy the cheap-o supplies.


Ticonderoga pencils are smooth and cheap. Easy to find as well. But you have to sharpen them by hand. That’s a bit of a bummer.

The bargain nibs listed are wonderful! However, one or all may not be ideal for your particular style or touch (nibs are like boyfriends, you might not like some and that’s okay). These nibs listed are guaranteed to be easily found at most art stores and will fit your Speedball Universal Holder. The Zebra G, Nikko G and Tachikawa G are great beginner nibs, but do not fit in the universal holder. You may be able to make it sort of work, but the orientation isn’t going to give you stable results.

I use the lacquered straight holder quite frequently. It’s great, but DO NOT get wet or the wood will split. The pen is still functional after the wood has split, it’s just less comfortable.

Higgins Eternal is a great ink! The consistency right out of the bottle is easy to work with and it’s not terribly corrosive to the nibs (just a teeny bit corrosive). The bottle is prone to leaking (don’t let the bottle freeze or it definitely will leak) and the ink doesn’t work on all paper types.

You may see some feathering and bleeding with Higgins on the Hammermill paper. You can still get great practice in regardless of the feathering ink, but if you see yourself being bothered by the feathering, try a different paper (see other paper options below). The Hammermill paper is great for beginners as you can easily print out guidelines directly on top of the paper and you can buy in reams for those heaps and heaps of initial practice.


Mid-range investment

If you’re in a spot to splurge a little more, get the mid-range materials and the bargain basement materials (like the nibs, ink and paper).

Canson Marker Layout Paper is semi-transparent and handles ink well. I like to print out my guidelines and slip them underneath the paper. It handles all inks well.

Using a mechanical pencil is convenient since you don’t have to sharpen the lead, it’s great for practicing in pencil and laying out compositions.

Peerless oblique holders are a little more expensive than the Speedball Oblique, but you can get them fitted to the larger nibs listed above. Those larger nibs are great for beginners and heavier hands, with the exception of the Leonardt Principal, it’s just a great nib to try.

The straight holder is going to be a little more water/ink resistant since it’s made with a slightly harder wood.

Sumi ink is super black, so you get nice stark lines. It takes forever to dry so I like to mix it with water, Higgins Eternal or Walnut Ink to dilute it.


 Highish-end Investment

I say highish-end because this isn’t the highest end. If you want to go all-out, you’re getting everything on all these lists list, gold inks, a custom turned holder and on and on. The sky is truly the limit on what you can spend on calligraphy materials. But that’s a different post (here is a gift guide for splurging) for a different time. But when it comes to just starting out, these materials listed are going to get you there with the least amount of frustration. But you may notice, there’s not a huge difference price-wise between the cost of materials in the budget end and the highish-end.

Rhodia paper handles all kinds of inks. I use gridded paper because guidelines are already printed on there. The walnut ink is silky and smooth (it also ships well because it comes in crystal form that you dilute with water) and gives you just a little bit of transparency and fast drying times.

The copperplate sampler is a wide range of nibs you can try out every one and see what suits you best. The adjustable oblique will fit any of those nibs. The mahogany straight holder is made out of a hard wood (obviously) that does well for pointed pen work. It’s also gorgeous.

So there you have it. You want to get started with calligraphy? Stock up on any of these things.

Want it all done for you? Purchase the kit. And heck! While you’re at it get the calligraphy class, too. The class includes lifetime access to the content (which gets new content annually) along with 30 days of instructor feedback. And it’s not just “great job” or “awesome”. We tell you what’s working well, what you can improve and give you bonus materials to help you keep going and troubleshoot.


Calligraphy Workshops in Salt Lake City, UT & Phoenix, AZ

I’m headed to Arizona this weekend for Pinners Conference!! I’ll be talking about 5 things you need to do when learning calligraphy. It’s only an hour-long, so I’ll be spending the time demonstrating, giving great advice and answering any questions that may come my way. You’ll come away with a wealth of knowledge, motivation to get started on learning calligraphy and a calligraphy alphabet to practice.


Join me in Arizona and Utah for this workshop. Use code MELISSA to sign up for my class. Sign up for Pinners right here.

Since it’s only an hour-long (the Pinners vibe is high-energy and the classes are quick), I’m holding calligraphy workshops post-Pinners in both Arizona and Salt Lake City! Because an hour-long lecture is never enough. Did you know that most calligraphy workshops (the guild-related ones) are north of 6 hours long? I’ll just be scratching the surface at an hour.

If you’re in the Phoenix, Arizona area (the workshop is in Peoria), click here to sign up for the 3 hour workshop on October 8, 2016.

If you’re in the Salt Lake City, Utah area (the workshop is in the Sugarhouse neighborhood), click here to sign up for the 3 hour workshop on November 10, 2016.


These workshops are all-inclusive, beginner workshops. If you have some or no experience, come! Lefties and friends with ugly handwriting are also welcome! Just bring your passion for letters. :)

Not sure what to expect at Pinners? See this segment I did for KUTV a couple weeks ago about the conference. Hope to see you there!

If you can’t come, don’t worry! My online calligraphy class is always on-going. It’s a party over there. Feel free to reach out in the comments below if you have any questions about any of these classes.


Slouchy Sweater for Junie

Girl Charlee approached me to see if I wanted to sew something with their fabric. Uh DUH. Yes! It’s about darn time that I turn on the freaking sewing machines. So thanks to them for the extra bit of motivation. :) I love their fabric.



I chose this heathered specialty hacci sweater knit. It’s a light-weight, ultra-soft sweater knit that’s perfect for the weird transition to fall where it’s hot one minute and cold the next. And it washes and wears so beautifully.


I made up the pattern for this sweater. I haven’t yet perfected the pattern, but once I do, I’ll share that with you. It’s only 2 pattern pieces, plus binding. It’s similar to the Cocoon Cardigan from True Bias. It’s a little smaller than I had originally planned, but it looks so darn cute on June anyway.




Junie is too cute. She didn’t want me to take photos of her, so I had to bribe her with phone time. But when it comes to painting her nails, she begs me to do it! She’s such a cute girly-girl. I can’t handle it, total cuteness overload!!

Outfit details:

  • bow: handmade
  • sweater: handmade
  • top: H&M
  • denim: Target
  • shoes: c/o Freshly Picked



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